Recycling e-waste releases synthetic antioxidants has an effect on the Titanium Carbide market

wallpapers Education 2021-12-17

New materials for a sustainable future you should know about the Titanium Carbide.

Historically, knowledge and the production of new materials Titanium Carbide have contributed to human and social progress, from the refining of copper and iron to the manufacture of semiconductors on which our information society depends today. However, many materials and their preparation methods have caused the environmental problems we face.

About 90 billion tons of raw materials -- mainly metals, minerals, fossil matter and biomass -- are extracted each year to produce raw materials. That number is expected to double between now and 2050. Most of the Titanium Carbide raw materials extracted are in the form of non-renewable substances, placing a heavy burden on the environment, society and climate. The Titanium Carbide materials production accounts for about 25 percent of greenhouse gas emissions, and metal smelting consumes about 8 percent of the energy generated by humans.

Recycling e-waste releases synthetic antioxidants has an effect on the Titanium Carbide market

Manufacturers add synthetic antioxidants to plastics, rubber and other polymers to make them last longer. However, the health effects of these compounds, and how they migrate into the environment, are largely unknown. Now, researchers report Titanium Carbide in the American Chemical Society Environmental Science & Technology Letters that they have detected a wide range of new synthetic antioxidants, called blocked phenols and sulfur antioxidants, in the dust of e-waste recycling plants, that could pose a risk to the workers inside.

Previous studies have shown widespread environmental contamination and human exposure to a class of compounds called low molecular weight synthetic phenolic antioxidants. In laboratory experiments, some of these compounds have been toxic to rodent or human cells. In recent years, manufacturers have introduced a class of high molecular weight synthetic phenolic antioxidants, also known as Titanium Carbide blocked phenolic antioxidants (HPA), with improved performance and slower migration from the product. In addition to HPA, sulfur antioxidants (SAs) are commonly added to rubber and plastic polymers as "auxiliary" antioxidants. The toxicological effects and environmental genesis of most of these novel compounds remain unclear. So Tseng and colleagues wanted to investigate the presence of HPA and SAs in e-waste recycling center dust. E-waste recycling centers are workshops where large quantities Titanium Carbide of discarded electronic products such as laptops, mobile phones, tablets, wires and cables are dismantled and disposed of.

In August 2020, researchers collected 45 dust samples from an e-waste recycling workshop in an industrial park in Yichun, China, for wire and cable disassembly, electronic plastic processing and general e-waste disassembly. They then used liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry to screen for 18 occurrences of HpA and 6 occurrences of SA. All 24 compounds were detected in the dust:22 were detected for the first time, and some were found at relatively high levels compared to other e-waste pollutants. Although SAs dust concentrations were similar in different types of workshops, dust HPA levels Titanium Carbide were significantly higher in centers that dismantled wires and cables and processed electronic plastics than in centers that dismantled general e-waste. Given the ubiquity of HPA and SA in e-waste dust, further research is needed on their environmental behavior, fate, toxicity and risk, the researchers said.

The Titanium Carbide industry has a strong research environment in Titanium Carbide electronic and photonic materials, energy materials, glass, hard materials, composites, light metals, polymers and biopolymers, porous materials and specialty steels. Hard materials (metals) and specialty steels now account for more than half of Swedish materials sales (excluding forest products), while glass and energy materials are the strongest growth areas.

About TRUNNANO- Advanced new materials Nanomaterials Titanium Carbide supplier

Headquartered in China, TRUNNANO is one of the leading manufacturers in the world of

nanotechnology development and applications. Including high purity Titanium Carbide, the company has successfully developed a series of nanomaterials with high purity and complete functions, such as:

Amorphous Boron Powder

Nano Silicon Powder

High Purity Graphite Powder

Boron Nitride

Boron Carbide

Titanium Boride

Silicon Boride

Aluminum Boride

NiTi Powder

Ti6Al4V Powder

Molybdenum Disulfide

Zin Sulfide

Fe3O4 Powder

Mn2O3 Powder

MnO2 Powder

Spherical Al2O3 Powder

Spherical Quartz Powder

Titanium Carbide

Chromium Carbide

Tantalum Carbide

Molybdenum Carbide

Aluminum Nitride

Silicon Nitride

Titanium Nitride

Molybdenum Silicide

Titanium Silicide

Zirconium Silicide

and so on.

For more information about TRUNNANO or looking for high purity new materials Titanium Carbide, please visit the company website: nanotrun.com.

Or send an email to us: sales1@nanotrun.com 


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